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Niacinamide and Eczema Skin Care

Niacinamide                 

Walk down any beauty aisle and you’re guaranteed to spot a vitamin C product on almost every shelf. But vitamin C🍊 isn’t the only water-soluble vitamin that promotes healthy skin. There is also Niacinamide.

What is niacinamide?

Niacinamide, also known as nicotinamide, is a form of vitamin B3, which aids in preventing permeability and locks in moisture while reducing irritation and protecting against wrinkles, hyperpigmentation, and fine lines.

Vitamin B-3 is an essential nutrient and a good additive to your dry skin care routine to aid in skin health.👩🏾‍⚕️ Although more research is needed, niacinamide serum applied to the skin may help treat certain skin conditions, including eczema.

What are the benefits of adding niacimide to my eczema skin care routine?*

A major benefit of niacinamide is that it’s an anti-inflammatory. 🧯 Niacinamide has the ability to reduce inflammatory cytokines, proteins that are released by immune cells in response to certain reactions or conditions, such as constant scratching and itching. Niacinamide also can help build proteins in the skin and lock 🔒 in moisture to prevent environmental damage.

Other benefits include:

  • Immunity. Niacinamide helps build keratin, one of the proteins that keeps your skin firm and healthy.
  • Lipid barrier. Niacinamide can help your skin grow a ceramide (lipid) barrier, which helps retain moisture.  Perfect for dry and eczema prone skin.
  • Protects against sun damage. Niacinamide can concurrently rebuild healthy skin cells while also protecting them from damage caused by ultraviolet rays.
  • Treats hyperpigmentation. There is some research to support the argument that niacinamide formulas of 5% concentration can be helpful in lightening dark spots.  This benefit may be due to the increased collagen production.
  • Protects against oxidative stress. Niacinamide helps build cells in the skin while also protecting them from environmental stresses, such as sunlight, blue light, pollution, and toxins.

When should I use niacinamide?

Most topical niacinamide come in a serum form. For your morning eczema skincare routine, use niacinmide after you've cleansed and toned your skin, but before you moisturize and apply sun screen. Since eczema prone skin is sensitive to dyes and fragrances, look for dye free and fragrance free formulas especially formulated for eczema prone skin. Always read the ingredients on the product labels and follow the instructions regarding use.

Teddy's Eczema Bar's AM Skin Care Routine:

Step 1:            Wet face with water

Step 2:            02 Naked Bar or 03 Naked Facial Cleanser

Step 3:            17 Calming Toner

Step 4:           19 Niacinamide 5% Serum

Step 5:            22 Naked Mango Butter

Step 6:            Daily Sunblock

 

What concentration of niacinamide is good for eczema prone skin?

For sensitive and dry skin, start with a lower concentration, like formulas of 2% niacinamide or less. Our 19 Niacinamide 5% Serum is best used for those whose eczema has caused hyperpigmentation or sun damage. On our label niacinamide is listed as Vitamin B3.

Interested in trying our 19 Niacimide 5% Serum before you buy?

We understand how you feel. Too many times you buy a "eczema" 😫 product only to find out that it triggered a flareup and now you're out of pocket the cost of the product and have a flare up😒.  Have no fear, we are hear. 😘 When you buy any of our other products, send us a note at hello@eczemabar.com asking for a sample of 19 Niacinamide 5% Serum to be placed with your order. We're happy to have you test it out before you commit.

Show your glow!

When used topically everyday, niacinamide may help improve your overall skin health. 🩺👩🏾‍⚕️19 Niacinamide 5% Serum traps moisture,🚿 hydrates the skin,💦 and repairs the skin barrier 🚒and is best for those wanting to stay moisturized for longer periods of time. Want to brighten your skin and show your glow 👼🏾 - add niacinamide to your eczema skincare routine.

 

*portions were summarized from Dr. Alan Carter's article in Healthline.


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